Completed Funded Research Projects

The Effect of Human Milk Feedings on Growth Velocity and Major Morbidity in Extremely Low Birthweight Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Rush University Medical Center Committe on Research Competitive Grant
July 2005 to July 2007
Principal Investigator
  • Aloka Patel, MD
Co-Investigator
  • Janet L. Engstrom, RN, PhD, CNM, WHNP
  • Paula Meier, RN, DNSc, FAAN
Study Synopsis: This study examined the relationship between dose and exposure period of human milk feedings and health care outcomes, including growth velocity, for a retrospective cohort of 130 extremely low birth weight (ELBW; <1000g birth weight) infants.
return to top

A Randomized Study of Human Milk-Based versus Bovine-based Nutrition for Very Low Birth Weight Pre-term Infants
Prolacta BioScience, Monrovia, CA
January 2008 to January 2009
Principal Investigator
  • Aloka Patel, MD
Co-Investigator
  • Paula Meier, RN, DSNc, FAAN
Study Synopsis: This multi-site study compared health outcomes for two randomized groups of VLBW infants: those who were fed a 100% human milk diet (own mothers' milk, Prolacta human milk fortifier and donor human milk, if needed); and those who were fed a partial bovine diet: (own mothers' milk, commercial based bovine-based fortifier and commercial formula, if needed).
return to top

The Impact of Early Enteral Feed Type on Initial Gut Microflora For Very Low Birthweight Infants

Rush University Medical Center Competitive Pilot Program Grant
October 2008 to September 2010
Principal Investigator
  • Aloka Patel, MD
Co-Investigators
  • Ece Mutlu, MD
  • Ali Keshavarzian, MD
  • Paula P. Meier, RN, DNSc, FAAN
  • Xavier Pombar, MD
Study Synopsis: This collaborative study examines the relationship between does and exposure period of human milk feedings, initial colonization pattersn of the gut and subsequent health outcomes in very low birthweight infants. A non-random prospective cohort of 60 eligible mothers and VLBW infants is being enrolled. The variable of interest is exposure to human milk feedings and outcome variables include gut bacterial fingerprints (PCR technology) and the morbidites of spsis, pneumonia and necrotizing entercolitis.
return to top